Lightning sparks wildfires in northern G ...

Lightning sparks wildfires in northern Greece

Lightning sparked three wildfires in remote parts of the Halkidiki peninsula in northern Greece in the early hours of Tuesday, according to the fire service. Ground and air crews were battling blazes in the uplands of Kavourotrypes and Vourvourou on the Sithonia leg of the peninsula on Tuesday morning, after putting out another fire in Afytos on the Cassandra leg earlier. On Sunday, a bolt of lighting is believed to have killed a 58-year-old motorcyclist on the outskirts of Thessaloniki. The man was found dead 40 kilometers east of the northern port city with a hole in his helmet.
Source - News archive

Police in Greece say motorcyclist killed ...

Police in Greece say motorcyclist killed by lightning strike

THESSALONIKI, Greece (AP) — Authorities in Greece say a 58-year-old motorcyclist was killed when lightning struck him on a highway. Police say the man was found dead 40 kilometers (25 miles) east of the northern city of Thessaloniki with a hole in his helmet, presumably the result of the lightning striking him. The victim was driving toward the city in stormy conditions. There were no details about burns on the body, but authorities say they are certain the motorcyclist's death was not the result of his 800-cc motorcycle falling after the lightning struck.
Source - News archive

A 36-year-old diver was killed after lig ...

A 36-year-old diver was killed after lightning struck his oxygen tank!

A 36-year-old diver was killed off a Florida beach after lightning struck his oxygen tank, authorities have said. The man was diving with three others off a boat near Deerfield Beach on Sunday. When he surfaced, ‘lighting struck his tank,’ said Deerfield Beach fire Chief Gary Fernaays. ‘He was approximately 30 feet from the boat at the time.’
Source - Did you know archive

Earthquake lightning?

What was that strange light in the sky? Many people overnight reported seeing strange lights in the sky, a phenomenon that has been reported for centuries before, during, and after earthquakes. Seismologists aren't in agreement about the causes of the hotly-debated phenomenon - called earthquake lights or, sometimes, earthquake lightning. And, of course, it's not clear whether the lights overnight in New Zealand were the phenomenon, or something else. One theory suggests dormant electrical charges in rocks are triggered by the stress of the Earth's crust and plate tectonics, transferring the charge to the surface where it appears as light. Historical reports include globes, or orbs, of glowing light, floating just above the ground or in the sky. Much like tidal research, it is an area that is notoriously difficult to investigate. Tidal stresses and their effects on the Earth are minute, but measurable, although many seismologists remain unconvinced by theories of "tidally triggered" earthquakes. With "earthquake light", the phenomenon is also notoriously difficult to observe, study, and measure.​ GNS seismologist Caroline Holden said there were anecdotal reports of lights in the sky. "Unfortunately, we cannot measure this phenomena or its extent with our instruments to provide a clear explanation," she said. The phenomenon has been documented for centuries. Hypotheses have suggested the movement of rocks could generate an electric field, others suggest quakes can lead to rocks conducting electromagnetic energy and a subsequent build up of electric charges in the upper atmosphere. Yet another theory suggests a link between the electric charge, or current, released by the earth ripping and buckling below the surface, and the magnetic properties of rock. The charge appears as light, so the theory goes. People reported similar strange lights in the sky during the 2011 Christchurch earthquake. In 1888, before a large quake around the Hanmer region, a strange glow in the sky was reported by observers. One recent study documented hundreds of sightings of strange light, glowing, and aurora-like reports, from 1600 to the 19th century. The study in the Seismological Research Letters suggested a charge builds up in rock inside the Earth's crust and, as it becomes rapidly unstable in a quake, expands outward. In an earthquake, the electrical charge transfers from below the surface to the surface, or above, depending on the conductivity of the rock - appearing as light. "When such an intense charge state reaches the Earth's surface and crosses the ground–air interface, it is expected to cause [an electric transmission and breakdown] of the air and, hence, an outburst of light. "This process is suspected to be responsible for flashes of light coming out of the ground and expanding to considerable heights at the time when seismic waves from a large earthquake pass by." The study said some seismologists also think the theory could account for other phenomena, such as changes to electrical fields, strange fog, haze, clouds, and low-frequency humming or radio frequency emission. In the study, the researchers found the light was more often associated with a type of quake in which tectonic plates are wrenched apart, known as a "rift" earthquake
Source - Did you know archive

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